Friday, December 30, 2011

As Seen in the Paper

From the Baltimore Sun, a story of people recreating history with needles and thread. Read here.

The three women, part of a core group of about 10 needlepointers, are stitching the second of the three tapestries, each 3 feet by 6 1/2 feet, in a needlepoint project known as the Annapolis Tapestries.

And really? They needed to point out that tapestry needle are dull and there's no risk of newbies bleeding onto the canvas? How cute is that?

9 comments:

Stitching By A Cornish Sea Shore said...

Interesting article, thank you for the link. Wishing you and your loved ones a very happy New Year, may it bring you gifts of joy, health and happiness and lots of stitching time for you.

The Chilly Hollow Needlepoint Adventure said...

The days of growing up around people who do all sorts of needlework as a matter of course are gone. All the women in both my parents' families did needlework of all kinds. Some of their children learned but none stitch much except me and I don't think any of their children, grandchildren and now great-grandchildren learned to even sew on buttons. It is shocking when I look back, but of course most folks have no ideas tapestry needles are blunt. They've never seen them, much less held them. We are dinosaurs or at least throwbacks!

Nancy L said...

Never thought I'd be proud to be a 'throwback'!!

Wendy TC said...

A sign to support how needlework is so less common is that there are more comments to your blog entry than there are to the original article at the Baltimore Sun website! I'm glad needlework is alive and well in my house...one daughter is hooked, one to go!

Donna said...

Be proud, Wendy. My daughter who totally rejected learning to stitch, came to me when she was in college and asked to learn to knit. I took her to a store and instead of buying yarn she bought a pattern and thread. I had the fabric already. And now she's hooked and has her own stash.

Nice comment about me having more comments than the original article!

Donna said...

@Jane. I can visualize the reporter being asked to stitch some and declining because he/she didn't want to bleed on the piece. And being shocked by finding out there is a such a thing as a blunt needle. Life is funny.

Needle Nicely said...

Thanks for this link--very interesting. I'm originally from Maryland and went to Girls' State in Annapolis when I was a high school senior. Ah! the memories!

The Chilly Hollow Needlepoint Adventure said...

Donna, I can see that reporter being afraid of needles, too! Bet he/she learned something, even if they weren't tempted to try it. Those "stitch in public" campaigns do have a point, don't they?

Sara Leigh said...

Nice pun, Jane, whether intended or not. :D

Thanks for pointing out this article. Not my kind of stitching, but very interesting and valuable.